Being able to bring a beautiful baby into this world is supposed to be one of the most joyous times of one’s life. However, when complications arise during the pregnancy or delivery, it can result in devastating — and sometimes irreparable — injuries to the baby. If the harm was avoidable, it is crucial that the parents become familiar with their legal rights as well as the rights that they have concerning their baby in regards to potential medical negligence. This is something that one couple from a state outside of New Mexico has done.

A hospital is being sued by a couple who says that the defendant hospital committed negligence when providing medical care to their premature son. The suit also names three specific doctors from the hospital. Toward the end of 2007, the mother was admitted into the hospital for a premature delivery of her son.

Unfortunately, the baby had a neonatal infection. The defendants are being accused of failing to properly and timely diagnose and treat this infection. As a result, the infection spread to the infant’s blood and nervous systems, resulting in irreversible injury to several organs, including the brain. In addition, the suit asserts that the infant lost any chance at a normal life and will incur continuous medical expenses for the rest of his life.

If the conduct of medical professionals fell below the acceptable standard of care, and it can be proved, it may be possible for a couple to recover monetary damages. A medical malpractice case like this can often be an uphill battle, but it can also be worth it in the end if the right parties are held accountable for their negligence. Medical malpractice claims often have deadlines. Therefore, for New Mexico individuals who find themselves in situations where they believe they are the victims of medical negligence, it is crucial to review the facts and speak to a legal professional as soon as possible.

Source: cookcountyrecord.com, “Parents allege Advocate Hospital, doctors guilty of malpractice in son’s brain damage“, Robert Hadley, Nov. 20, 2015