For many people, home remedies are the first choice for common ailments. Additionally, people in New Mexico and elsewhere spend a small fortune on vitamins and supplements to enhance their health and stave off disease. However, when a person goes to the doctor for an illness or other complaint, he or she expects the treatment to be medically sound and governmentally approved. If it is not and the patient suffers because of the treatment, the doctor risks a medical malpractice claim.

One doctor in another state is facing this situation. After other health providers complained to authorities of the allergist/immunologist’s unorthodox methods, investigators from the state’s Department of Financial and Professional Regulation discovered that the doctor was apparently making his own vaccinations from a combination of vodka and cat saliva. A search of the doctor’s office revealed unsterile conditions and containers of ingredients the doctor used to manufacture his serums.

Authorities believe that, using oral and nasal versions, he may have administered his vaccines to infants as young as seven days old. Apparently, instead of dispensing vaccines approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, the doctor had been offering his homemade versions for over 10 years. In addition, the doctor faces charges of neglecting to inform his patients of the risks they incurred by not receiving legal immunizations.

Doctors in New Mexico and elsewhere who resist protocol put the lives of their patients in danger. The patients this doctor treated may be at risk of contracting serious diseases due to ineffective vaccinations. When a physician, who is in a position of trust, causes harm because he is negligent in his duties, any patient who suffers as a result has every right to pursue a medical malpractice claim.

Source: healthaim.com, “Medical Malpractice: Chicago Doctor Gives Children Cat Saliva, Vodka to Treat Allergies“, Darwin Malicdem, Oct. 4, 2016